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Word of the Week

Word of the Week

Word of the Week: Wax

August 31, 2015

Wax

Synonyms: increase, grow, develop, rise, expand, escalate, deepen, intensify, widen, broaden, spread, mushroom, snowball.

Origins: Old English weaxan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wassen and German wachsen, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek auxanein and Latin augere ‘to increase’.

(Image: Stale Grut, source: Google)

Word of the Week

Word of the Week: Schism

August 24, 2015

Schism

Synonyms: division, split, rift, breach, rupture, break, separation, severance,estrangement, alienation, detachment.

Origin: lLate Middle English, from Old French scisme, via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek skhisma‘cleft’, from skhizein ‘to split’.

(Image: Matthew Weibe, source: Google)

Word of the Week

Word of the Week: Ennui

August 17, 2015

Ennui

 

Synonyms: boredom, tedium, listlessness, lethargy, lassitude, languor, restlessness,weariness, sluggishness, enervation

Origin: Mid 18th century, French, from Latin in odio(n- ), from mihi in odio est ‘it is hateful to me’.

(Image: Schlomit Wolf, source: Google)

 

Word of the Week

Word of the week: Sanctimonious

July 27, 2015

Sanctimonius

Synonyms: self-righteous, holier-than-thou, churchy, pious, pietistic, moralizing,unctuous, smug, superior

Origin: Early 17th century (in the sense ‘holy in character’): from Latin sanctimonia ‘sanctity’ (from sanctus ‘holy’)

 

(Image: José Inesta, source: Google)

Word of the Week

Word of the week: Frolic

July 20, 2015

Frolic (1)

Synonyms: frisk, gambol, cavort, caper, sport, scamper, skip, dance,romp, trip, prance, leap, spring, hop, jump.

Origin: Early 16th century: from Dutch vrolijk ‘merry, cheerful’.

(Image: Joshua Earle, source: Google)

Word of the Week

Word of the Week: Incandescent

June 29, 2015

Incandescent

Synonyms: intensely hot, burning, fiery, ablaze, radiant, brilliant, dazzling, luminous.

Origin: late 18th century, from French, from Latin incandescent- ‘glowing’, from the verb incandescere, from in- (expressing intensive force) + candescere ‘become white’ (from candidus ‘white’).

(Image: Morgan Sessions, source: Google)